STORMR Deer Camp: Into the Hoh Rainforest (Pt. III)

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Nature is stealth. Walk out into the woods and count the number of wild animals spotted. Many are heard, but few are seen. However there are eyes watching you and scents tracing your every movement. Stalking and hunting a wild animal is one of the most difficult thing to do, especially in the shadows of the Hoh Rainforest, but the rewards are one that will feed your family for months to follow. Practice the art of patience, endurance and awareness while chilled temperatures permeate the saturated environments of the Olympic Peninsula. On the hunt with STORMR foul-weather gear.

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STORMR Deer Camp: Into the Hoh Rainforest (Pt. II)

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It rained and then it poured. With STORMR gear, the woodsmen were kept warm as a low ceiling of clouds passed, and dry as the hiking became arduous with sweat and fatigued. Heavy ferns draped in our path while carpets of green moss stretched before us. Animal trails were easy to find, their beaten paths the only thing breaking the wildness of the Hoh Rainforest. These led us to the wide open swaths of America’s logging industry.

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Cameron Karsten Photography

STORMR Deer Camp: Into the Hoh Rainforest (Pt. I)

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Recently, I ventured into the Hoh Rainforest with STORMR foul-weather gear for a 4-day 3-night adventure. With four woodsmen we explored a sodden mossy wilderness furthest from humanity. These are the western edges of the Olympic Peninsula; a place so remote and ecologically diverse that it could be considered its own evolutionary island.

What we were in search of was the elusive black-tail buck. What we discovered were torrential downpours, rivers full of returning steelhead and King salmon, as well as pockets of clear-cut forests amidst pristine woodlands of idyllic nature where migratory elk bugled near the trails of deer, bear, and cougar scat.

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For more visit www.STORMRrusa.com and www.CameronKarsten.com

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Cameron Karsten Photography

STORMR Campaign: Olympic Wildness Pt. III

_N9A4726After a night’s rest, the men returned to the waters, this day wading into the flowing waters of the Olympic tributaries. Their STORMR foul-weather gear proved protective and durable as fishermen Simon Pollack and Skyler Vella threw flies before returning steelhead and salmon.

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For a complete portfolio, please visit www.CameronKarsten.com

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STORMR Campaign: Olympic Wildness – Pt. II

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Fishermen Simon Pollack and Skyler Vella reload and reseek the elusive steelhead within the Wild Olympics on a recent campaign for STORMR foul-weather gear.

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For a complete portfolio, please visit www.CameronKarsten.com

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STORMR Campaign: Olympic Wildness – Pt. I

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 Walking into the Olympics of western Washington is a step back into time. Undisturbed and wild America – a land of the tallest trees, isolated mountains, rugged coastline, and an epic run of salmon and steelhead. Here’s a sneak peek at a recent campaign for STORMR foul-weather gear with fishermen Simon Pollack and Skyler Vella.

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For a complete portfolio, visit www.CameronKarsten.com

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Ethan Currier – Sculpting the Power of Stone

EthanCurrier-366To cut stone sounds like a recipe of alchemy. But it takes power, not always the power of enormous piston-driven spikes and powder-lit explosives. Often, with the right hand-tools and visionary skill, rocks can be as easily molded as clay. Meet Ethan Currier.

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EthanCurrier-244When on Bainbridge Island, Ethan lives in Eagle Harbor aboard his 1940s’ refurbished navy boat, building unique rock sculptures by day. Located in a small modest workshop, which once ran as a single-pump gas station, Ethan brings in specific stones to match his concept of upcoming projects, visualizing their forms and structure prior. By design and with the use of few hand-tools, these ordinary stones take on new organic shapes.

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EthanCurrier-235Having spent the summer on the east coast working on boats and building commissioned pieces for personal gardens and cityscapes, Ethan continues to create, building a reputation and potential-future following like those of artists Andy Goldsworthy and Dale Chihuly. A controvertial sculpture on a city-owned island Blakely Rock brought him in contact with people who both love and disapprove of his work. Over four nights in the middle of winter in 2012, Ethan installed a 12-foot tall stone man in the common yoga posture Tree Pose. Visible from the east shores of Bainbridge Island, as well as along the Seattle-Bainbridge ferry route, the sculpture has become in need of further special attention. Upon his recent return, people have continually asked him about it. He responds with a calming smile, “It needs repairs.” Locals now are expressing their interest in helping in anyway possible in its resurrection.

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The Honey Harvest is Near

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With the nearing end of the the summer, a north hemisphere-wide honey harvest is about to begin, and I’m feeling pretty damn excited.  Longtime friend and fellow traveler Dennie P (aka D) stopped by and had the opportunity to check in on my hives.  I’m hoping he’s hooked!  He looks like it.

Location: BI, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D MarkIII w/Canon EF 16-35mm 2.8L II USM Lens

35mm, 1/200 sec at ƒ/7.1, ISO 100, tripod.

Post: LR4 & Adobe PSCC

An Artform for Ages: Forging w/Ryan Landworth

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I know Ryan from the local community on Bainbridge Island, and as we got to know each other, I asked to come and shoot him at work in his shop.  As I walked into his space, I realized what an extreme artform this age-old process is.  Lots of heat.  Huge machinery.  And tons of force.  Here is a test phase of more shooting to come with blacksmith artisan Ryan Landworth.

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Cameron Karsten Photography

Photo of the Day: Casey Zautke of Barn Owl Builds

Casey Zautke of Barn Owl Builds prepares a beam of fir for a conference table

Hot off PS6, I’m stoked with my most recent image.  Shot yesterday with Casey Zautke of Barn Owl Builds, he and his brother Josh own a customized furniture company. Each piece of reclaimed wood is hand-picked specific for each order.  Here, Casey runs a thick fir plank through a joiner in order to flatten its surfaces as they begin constructing a conference table.

Over the next couple of months I’m thrilled to be working with them, creating content for their brand and new website.

Location: Barn Owl Builds – Seattle, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark III with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Lens

16mm, 1/60 sec at ƒ/10, ISO 100, tripod, composite.

Post: LR4 & Adobe PS6

Cameron Karsten Photography