The Last Great Wild Place

The Olympic National Park is in my mind one of the last great wild places on earth. It’s absolutely remarkable with thick rich flora and fauna, and some of the last largest stands of trees. To venture into its rivers is an experience in and of itself, especially when you’re walking with two great anglers. Dylan Tomine and Nate Mantua are highly educated about the remaining wild fisheries around the world, especially the great steelhead runs along the West Coast. With Sage and Patagonia, I had the opportunity to spend two days wandering up and down the tributaries with them, and a host of other wildlife.

 

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Seattle Times Op-Ed: Indigenous knowledge is critical to understanding climate change

© Cameron Karsten Photography The Nature Conservancy at the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, WA with Tribal member TJ

As we prepare to join Saturday’s March for Science, please understand that by integrating traditional knowledge with Western science, we can solve some of our biggest challenges, including those brought by our changing climate.

Good science is critical to our health, ability to live full lives and community well-being. We use science to advance medicine, enhance our use of natural resources, ensure our food supply and much more. That’s why more than a million people around the world joined the March for Science in 2017 and why we are gearing up again to march for science on April 14.

Western science is just one way of knowing. Indeed, traditional knowledge and wisdom of indigenous peoples is recognized by the United Nations for its potential to sustainably manage complex ecosystems. Yet all too often, Western science has disregarded centuries of science-based knowledge coming from Native Americans and other indigenous peoples.

© Cameron Karsten Photography The Nature Conservancy at the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, WA with Tribal member TJ

Indigenous peoples have lived in our particular locations for many generations, and we define ourselves in relation to our home environment. Our deep and long-standing relationships with the environment are unique; our very existence depends on our ability to conserve and maintain our lands and waters for future generations.

Today, tribes, First Nations, indigenous peoples and Aboriginals are sounding a loud alarm about the impacts of climate change. Rising sea levels, broken natural systems, and increasing fire and flooding are apparent and documented.

For example, stocks of many fish species like Pacific hake are sensitive to ocean temperature along the California Current, and recent declines in their numbers have serious implications for the well-being of my own Makah Tribe.

While others debate the causes of climate change, we who live close to the land are experiencing major impacts from our changing climate and call for immediate and strong action to protect the resources on which we all rely. We can’t afford to disregard indigenous knowledge about climate change.

© Cameron Karsten Photography The Nature Conservancy at the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, WA with Tribal member TJ

Growing up as a member of the Makah Tribe, I relied on the empirical knowledge of my ancestors to determine where to fish and how to locate other sources of food. My community relied on indigenous experiences to understand how to keep ourselves healthy.

When I was a child, my father taught me to navigate our ocean territory through currents, tides and landmarks. This knowledge, along with the life cycle of fish and time of year, allowed for the successful, sustainable harvest of species such as halibut, black cod and lingcod. In the years that followed, my peers and I transferred knowledge to other members of the family who integrated the information into current fishing and management practices.

As a youth, I’d get up in the mornings, often before sunrise, and leave the house overlooking a beach. There was no backpack, no lunch box. I was taught what our land would provide through all the seasons: roots, berries, sea urchins and mussels, to name a few. The knowledge of how, where and when to harvest is a way of life, always done in a manner that ensures the resources are sustained for the next person. These teachings and values laid the foundation for the work I completed in tribal leadership.

© Cameron Karsten Photography The Nature Conservancy at the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, WA with Tribal member TJ

To our north, Tlingit and Haida elders observe young herring following older herring to spawning grounds. When industrial fishing removes the elder herring from spawning sites, the stock is destroyed, as the young fish can no longer find their way home. Failure to heed these traditional observations is leading to the demise of herring and threatening aspects of Tlingit and Haida culture that are closely tied to herring.

A recent news item featured the astonishing observation that birds in Australia intentionally spread fire by carrying burning sticks. While this is fascinating, it has long been known to the Aboriginals. Using fire as a management tool is widespread throughout indigenous cultures. Makah is no exception. For centuries our ancestors used fire to manage crops of cranberries and tea. These resources are currently threatened by our changing climate, as well as the laws and regulations that govern the use of fire.

© Cameron Karsten Photography The Nature Conservancy at the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay, WA with Tribal member TJ

Respecting and embracing indigenous knowledge as important science benefits all of us. In looking for solutions to the environmental dilemmas that confront us, it is critical to apply indigenous knowledge. All of us are looking for a better understanding of the Earth and her ecosystems. By integrating traditional knowledge with Western science, together we can solve some of our biggest challenges, including those brought by our changing climate.

As communities worldwide prepare to March for Science, this focus is appropriate and important. Threats to scientific knowledge must be rejected, and decision making based on fact must be embraced. Equally important, we should also embrace 10,000-plus years of field observation by indigenous peoples around the world.

This empirical knowledge has sustained people and cultures and has laid the groundwork for many modern “discoveries.” Indigenous peoples are truly the experts of their area and place, with a deep understanding of the interconnectedness of nature and our role in conserving resources for future generations.

Original Post (April 10, 2018)

Alaska by Air for RdM – Ketchikan Helicopters

Summer in Alaska is a beautiful thing, especially above the canopy. Shot for RdM – Ketchikan Helicopters out of Ketchikan, AK.

Newly redesigned website at www.CameronKarsten.com

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SealLine Dry Bags and the Unknown Waters of Winter

SealLine, a kayak, an outdoorsman, and a calm foggy winter morning. + 2hrs before work…

New website via PhotoFolio up at http://www.CameronKarsten.com

Alaska with GrundensUSA

In the summer of ’17, I finally got assigned my first voyage to Alaska. It has been a deep-seated desire to visit one of the states’ last frontiers, and do to it with GrundensUSA in collaboration with Dark Seas Division and Silver Wave Seafood Co. aboard the Seine fishing vessel Silver Wave was nothing short of epic.

Check out my fully redesigned website at http://www.CameronKarsten.com

Nathan Myhrvold for French “Les Echos”

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Nathan Myhrvold’s reactions are as unusual as the man himself. His bursts of laughter would awaken the dead. His voice soars to high registers with each burst of enthusiasm – and these are frequent because the number of passions he holds boggles the mind (Anois Moutot for Les Echos).

A fascinating man following his dreams and helping the world one can of canned bread at a time. Assignment for French newspaper Les Echos earlier this year at Myhrvold’s Intellectual Ventures compound in Bellevue, WA.

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

Intellectual Ventures with Nathan Myhrvold in Bellevue, WA

 

Zillow Group Annual Report – Consumer Housing Trend Report 2017

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One of the largest projects I’ve shot so far (as well as produced, and talent and location scouted), and one of the greatest clients. Thanks crew and Zillow team! Online available at: https://www.zillow.com/report/2017/

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Amazon HQ for Handelsblatt

An interesting assignment for a new client… Handelsblatt… I don’t know what the article reads, but it was fun to see the insides of Amazon HQ in downtown Seattle, and learn the future of automation with Alexa. I’m out.

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Tearsheet: Seattle Met’s “Secrets of the Olympic Peninsula” Feature

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Jane S., Seattle Met’s Art Director, called and sent me out on a little circuitous route on the Olympic Peninsula. I was happy to oblige, as jumping in my Tacoma with a cab packed of camera gear and a bed setup for camping, is one of my simplest pleasures. Below are the resulting images. But first a quick write up about “How We Got Those Shots” in the Behind The Scenes section:

“There is never enough time, especially when it comes to visiting one of the many outdoor escapes our state has to offer. Fortunately, photographer Cameron Karsten – who is that perfect combination of avid outdoorsman and stellar photographer – is no stranger to the Olympic Peninsula, star of this month’s cover story. The photo on our table of contents is from a fishing trip Karsten took, and the surf shot you’ll find in the feature is of one of his buddies. Of course, being near the coast means weather is always a factor. Karsten’s visit in early June was no exception. There were slight breaks in the clouds, but the sky stayed frustratingly gray and rainy. Which brings me to the cover; while Cameron did get some striking photos of the peninsula’s famous Tree of Life, our web editor (and occasional staff photographer), Alison Klein, happened to be camping there the week prior – and captured some sun-soaked-near-dusk shots we just couldn’t resist.” – Jane S., Seattle Met art director

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And for a better view:

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

Olympic Penninsula Top 25 for Seattle Met

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Santa’s House on Zillow

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Thrilled to see this project come to fruition. Last month I worked with Zillow and a wonderful crew to photograph Santa’s House in the North Pole. Yes, the North Pole. Yes, it was bloody cold. And no, Mr. or Mrs. Claus weren’t there. They must’ve been busy or something (kinda rude to not at least stop by and say hello).

Thank you Zillow, my talented crew, Kaleo and team, Beth of Birdhouse Creative, and Justin of Jaya Productions. Below are some images from the frigid shoot, as well as a list of PR links. Happy Holidays!

Santa’s House on Zillow: http://www.zillow.com/santas-house/

TODAY Show: http://www.today.com/video/zillow-posts-santa-s-home-at-north-pole-for-650-000-but-it-s-not-for-sale-821810755504

ABC News: http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/inside-santa-claus-cozy-north-pole-home-valued/story?id=44008417

Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/now-you-can-buy-santas-house-in-the-north-pole_us_584041cbe4b09e21702cf835

GeekWire: http://www.geekwire.com/2016/santas-north-pole-home-zillow-check-zestimate-photos-toy-lovers-paradise/

InStyle: http://www.instyle.com/lifestyle/home-decorating/home-tours/inside-santa-claus-north-pole-house?iid=sr-link2

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Cameron Karsten Photography
Adventure, Lifestyle, Advertising (Stills+Motion)
www.CameronKarsten.com
206.605.9663
PNW, USA