Zillow Group Annual Report – Consumer Housing Trend Report 2017

Zillow_Q3report_2017_TC_Bedroom1_904

One of the largest projects I’ve shot so far (as well as produced, and talent and location scouted), and one of the greatest clients. Thanks crew and Zillow team! Online available at: https://www.zillow.com/report/2017/

Zillow_Q3report_2017_NP_LivingRoom3_330Zillow_Q3report_2017_TC_LivingRoom1_1160Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_SidePorch2_2352Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_Kitchen1_1680Zillow_Q3report_2017_MCM_Exterior1_7

Zillow_Q3report_2017_TC_Kitchen3_741Zillow_Q3report_2017_NP_Patio2_437Zillow_Q3report_2017_NP_Kitchen1_718Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_Bedroom1_2095Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_SidePorch1_2316Zillow_Q3report_2017_NP_KidsRoom1_2270Zillow_Q3report_2017_NP_Kitchen2_722Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_Kitchen2_1793Zillow_Q3report_2017_CFH_Exteriors_5Zillow_Q3report_2017_MCM_Exterior1_13

Screen Shot 2017-11-07 at 5.03.56 PMScreen Shot 2017-11-07 at 5.04.40 PMScreen Shot 2017-11-07 at 5.04.59 PMScreen Shot 2017-11-07 at 5.05.20 PM

The Last American Homesteaders: Pt II

CountryLife-126

Country living is dynamic, inside the cabin and out. Things don’t appear the same as if you’re living in an urban environment. Instead of concrete or brick foundations, walls are made of not just wood, but entire logs…big logs. And instead of finding house plants and framed pictures on these wall of beautiful distant locations, you’ll find what was once living in your yard stuffed, anthropomorphized and placed inside. Once again, country living is all about being in harmony, or being one, with nature, and then taking that to a new level.

CountryLife-143

Sand rats are friendly despite their appearance once giving a human personality

CountryLife-130

CountryLife-153

A coyote guarding the door

CountryLife-163-Edit

A black bear and badger go head-to-head for a dead sand rat.

CountryLife-7-Edit

Stepping outside you’ll spot a frozen land awaken as a river passes listlessly through the valley. Hints of pinks and oranges wash away the purples of night while geese begin to ruffle and hawks take flight. Another day in the country.

Next Post (Pt. III) –>

logo_blackTrajan

The Last American Homesteaders: Pt I

RanchHand-102

Life in the country is not an idealized peaceful existence unless you subscribe to the following as elements of such; 5AM start times to milk Daisy Bell the Cow, -5 degree temperatures while hopping on a quad with windchill factors in the -20s, your tears turning eyelashes into frozen shelves, your lips taut and crisp, ears and hands burning as if squeezed in a vice just before numbness sets in, and full days in the field, combing the backcountry for livestock and breaks in the fence line. Add to this clearing pathways of 50 foot toppled trees using a 32 inch chain saw or employing the exhaust of your Polaris’ engine to warm freezing hands after removing three inch thick ice sheets from the numerous watering troughs the cattle need to survive during these cold winter months.

To the ranchers and farmers who thrive out here around the John Day river near Spray OR on the east side of the Cascade mountains, these elements feed their deep spiritual and physical connection to the land. Our rewards for their sacrifice are fresh fruit, vegetables, grains and grass fed beef. Their rewards though are profound and pure. Fresh unpasteurized milk, with warm chicken and duck eggs, and turkeys for Thanksgiving. Here life is shared with elk herds that roam the pristine hills, with bears that hibernate in their caves while cougars and bobcats stalk deer and other game through the sparse pine forests of the hillsides and valleys. The setting sun with its darkening sky reveal, in this high desert, an Atlas of stars, shining with a native brilliance undimmed by the light pollution we’ve all grown accustomed to. A moody fog, lit by that brilliance, courses along the path of the frozen John Day below. As day turns to night, the night crawlers fall into their sleep as the daytrippers awaken.

All around the sounds of the natural world play unspoiled by human industry. The meter of this hard but simple life is not kept by a clock, rather, by the dawn’s early light, the shrunken shadows of high noon, and finally their elongated statures as the sun begins to set are, the timepieces of these hills. As the sky’s hues expand and intensify at sunset and the temperature begins to plummet, the body’s hunger will be satisfied in a kitchen where a pot of steaming milk with honey and spices warms and perfumes the air. Here is a glimpse of life in the high country of Spray, Oregon.

RanchHand-13

RanchHand-79

Daisy Bell the Cow being milked in the barn just after 5AM

RanchHand-11

RanchHand-171-Edit

At -5 degrees, this 2,000lb mare had no issue watching the morning sun rise

RanchHand-142

Tom the Turkey was the stud

RanchHand-124

RanchHand-216

RanchHand-219

Micheal F. starts the day with his wife at 5AM and as soon as there is light he is off into the backcountry. Micheal provides full-care to ranch owners; managing and operating a ranch, and learning new ways to evolve the farmer’s marketplace.

RanchHand-222

RanchHand-419

RanchHand-437

Clearing watering troughs requires thick skin, but the breath and the Polaris offer enough relief. The daily high while in Spray was 10 degrees.

RanchHand-442

RanchHand-366

RanchHand-368

The John Day River below

RanchHand-520

Providing mineral and salt blocks in the backcountry

RanchHand-324

RanchHand-274

Juniper trees are weeds in the high country. They are clear cut to make room for grasses in order to form pasture.

RanchHand-295

RanchHand-352

Sunset in the backcountry pasture at an elevation of 4000 feet

Next Post (Pt. II) –>

logo_blackTrajan

Olympic Day Hiking – The Brothers

OlympicHiking-34

Spent a sunny summer day hiking to the base of The Brothers on the Olympic Peninsula, reaching just above the tree-line before running out of time.  An hour and twenty minutes up to Lena Lake and then an additional three hours upwards.  We passed below massive pines and wound through streams that disappeared beneath the riverbeds.

OlympicHiking-45

OlympicHiking-62

OlympicHiking-13

OlympicHiking-4

OlympicHiking-205

OlympicHiking-78

OlympicHiking-115

OlympicHiking-119

OlympicHiking-206

OlympicHiking-122

OlympicHiking-132

OlympicHiking-99

OlympicHiking-105

Cameron Karsten Photography