Photo Essay: Ryderville Ink tatts Paris Gore

 

Last week my buddy and fellow photographer Paris Gore stepped into Tracy Lang’s Ryderville Ink realm to experience his first tatt.  He wanted a skeleton cedar tree.  She designed it, sketched it, and then drew it under his skin.  It was nice watching a friend feel the pain while photographing.  It made my time under the needle more enjoyable (the beer is a prop in the above photo).

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Cameron Karsten Photography

Photo Essay: Ryderville Ink’s Tsunami Over Mt. Baker

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Tracy Lang moves from huge woodblock prints to the art of the tattoo.  Welcome the new Ryderville Ink.  Unlike any tattoo I’ve seen before, her Tsunami Over Mt. Baker wraps the right shoulder with a pinhole view of Mt. Baker as the body’s shoulder blade carries a wispy yet powerful Japanese-style tsunami over its summit.  Bad ass. And if you would ever want a piece of art on your body, it would be by Tracy Lang of Ryderville Ink.

I shot this series of images as Tracy’s friend Shelley from Whidbey Island sat through the final three hours of work.

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Cameron Karsten Photography

Tracy Lang and the Grapefruit Tattoos

The other day I had the chance to photograph Tracy Lang, an accomplished woodblock print artist.  But she wasn’t doing woodblock.   Tracy was doing grapefruits, practicing her new tattooing skills on the skins of this fruit with the inspiration of the late writer and watercolor artist Henry Darger, painter Maxfield Parrish, and tattoo artist Musa

Location: Bainbridge Island, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark III with Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Lens

16mm, 1/5 sec at ƒ/18, ISO 100, tripod.

Post: Adobe LR4 & PS6

Woodblock Seasons, Sweet Gum Prints

Woodblock printing is either a small-scale process or a large-range endeavor. Contributor Cameron Karsten explores the process and the result through artist Tracy Lang’s eye for detail and love of the end result.

via Woodblock Seasons, Sweet Gum Prints.

Photo Essay: The Woodcut Art of Tracy Lang