Photo of the day: Sunset Glaze

Seattle Central Creative Academy: Photography Assignment (Aperture)

I’ve always enjoyed observing and learning about bees, and with this next assignment to show the opposites of aperture, one frame wide open with a shallow depth of field and the other as deep as it would be deemed fitting.  Thus, with a 70-200mm lens and an attached doubler, I set my 5D Mark II on a Manfrotto tripod and started shooting.  The first one was as shallow as possible, isolating the entrance to the hive and stopping the bees in motion.

Location: Bainbridge Island, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark II with Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM, attached Canon EF 2.0X III Telephoto Extender

400mm, 1/80 sec at f/5.6, ISO 1000, tripod mount, trigger fired.

Post: Adobe LR3 & Photoshop CS5

To create depth of field I closed the aperture to f/64 and set a Canon Speedlite 580EX II flash with a Gary Fong LightSphere Collapsible Diffuser onto the bee hive.  With each pop, the bees were froze in motion, however the extended shutter speed capture more ambient light in the frame and began turning the bees into ghostly apparitions.

Location: Bainbridge Island, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark II with Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM, attached Canon EF 2.0X III Telephoto Extender

400mm, 1 sec at f/64, ISO 200, tripod mount, trigger fired.

Post: Adobe LR3 & Photoshop CS5

Seattle Central Creative Academy: Photography Assignment (Shutter Speeds)

To freeze and create motion involve one key element: light.  With enough light you can freeze your image and make time stand still.  With way too much light, your object in motion will become a white backdrop.  And within a studio you have all options available to use one subject in order to freeze it’s substance as well as allow motion to move in the subject.  I experimented with a blue water vase from Anthropologie and the action of pouring water.  For the above shot, the process was simple: dark studio, two Q-Flashes, camera on tripod, shutter release trigger and the correct adjustments.

Location: Home Studio, Bainbridge Island, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM

165mm, 1 sec at f/5.6, ISO 1000, tripod mount.

Post: Adobe LR3 & Photoshop CS5

The next shot was more complex because I discovered that by slowing the shutter speed to capture the motion of the water into the container, and simultaneously popping the flash, I only captured the instant when to flashes fired.  And when the flashes were off, and the shutter speed adjusted even longer, the clarity of the water never appeared in the final frame, only the jug against the black background.  So, by changed liquids, substituting coconut milk for water, and turning off all lights once the jug was in focus in camera, I started pouring in the coconut milk before triggering the shutter speed for 2 secs and viola.

Location: Home Studio, Bainbridge Island, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM

210mm, 2 sec at f/5.6, ISO 1000, tripod mount.

Post: Adobe LR3 & Photoshop CS5

Seattle Central Creative Academy: Photography Assignment (Existing Light)

As part of our first assignment in Seattle Central’s 1st yr Commercial Photography program, students were asked to photograph an object using existing light; meaning no false lighting, only the sun, a reflective surface, and our innovation.  I chose a feather resting in a small glass jar to represent a writer’s quill photographed as a still-life.  The above image was created using a sheet of black construction paper as a seamless, with the sun at camera right and a reflector placed 90 degrees on camera left.

Location: Cal Anderson Park, Seattle, WA

Camera/Lens Specifics: Canon 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM

105mm, 1/60 sec at f/22, ISO 800, tripod mount.

Post: Adobe LR3 & Photoshop CS5